Psychiatrist Administrator V: thoughts on effective leadership

November 29th, 2010 by gelenberg Leave a reply »

A good leader is always respectful. Some people we really like and admire—others less so. Regardless, all merit respect from a leader—at all times. Some comments may be thoughtless or uninformed. Still, the leader must respond with tact and diplomacy. You may hold and share strong opinions, but do so in a manner that is respectful: in word, tone, and body language.

Respond to communications in a timely manner. Create a system (paper, electronic, assistants) that ensures timely follow-through on all promises.

Integrity is essential.

Leaders are expected to make more money, have bigger offices, and enjoy other perquisites. But the leader must be altruistic, putting the interests and needs of the people he or she is responsible for ahead of his/her own. The host serves him/herself last at dinner, so to speak. If you must lay people off, it’s not a good time to give yourself a raise or buy something expensive for yourself.

Be thoughtful in important personal matters. For example, acknowledge personal losses and celebrations.

Be a good role model. Personally illustrate your values by your own behavior.

Leaders are expected to make more money, have bigger offices, and enjoy other perquisites.  But the leader must be altruistic, putting the interests and needs of the people he or she is responsible for ahead of his/her own. The host serves him/herself last at dinner so to speak. If you must lay people off, it’s not a good time to give yourself a raise or buy something expensive for yourself.

Be thoughtful in important personal matters. For example, acknowledge personal losses and celebrations.

Be a good role model. Personally illustrate your values by your own behavior.

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