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IN THIS ISSUE:
February 2012

Agomelatine
Because agomelatine shows only modest benefits in the treatment of depression and requires liver function monitoring, there seems little reason to select it over other agents.

SSRIs Reduce the Risk of MI
Long-term use of selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) seems to decrease the risk of myocardial infarction in patients with depression.

Antidepressant Risks in Older Patients
Elderly patients who take antidepressants have a greater risk of adverse events, such as falls, confusion, and agitation, than those who do not take antidepressants.

In Brief
Younger Age at Onset of Cannabis Use Associated with Early Symptoms of Psychosis; Medical Comorbidity High in Patients with Bipolar Disorder

Varenicline and Suicide Risk
The use of varenicline (Chantix) for smoking cessation appears to present a substantial and statistically significant increase in risk of depression and suicidal or self-injurious behavior.

ADHD Drugs: Safe for Young Hearts?
A retrospective cohort study found no increased risk for serious cardiovascular events associated with medication treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children.

Agomelatine

February 2012

A synthetic analogue of the hormone melatonin, agomelatine was approved as an antidepressant in Europe in 2009. The manufacturer is expected to submit a New Drug Application to the US FDA in 2012. Agomelatine stimulates melatonin MT1 and MT2 and inhibits serotonin 5-HT2C

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