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IN THIS MONTH'S ISSUE:
September 2014

Inhaled Loxapine
An inhalation powder formulation of loxapine (Adasuve) has been approved by the FDA to treat acute agitation resulting from schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder in adults.

Lithium in the Elderly
Elderly patients taking low doses of lithium to attenuate the course of Alzheimer disease experience more overall adverse effects than placebo-treated patients, most notably weight gain, diabetes mellitus, and cardiac arrhythmia.

Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain and Other Adverse Metabolic Effects: Purported Antidotes
When switching agents is not feasible and diet and exercise are ineffective, current evidence points to metformin (Glucophage and others) as the best antidote for antipsychotic-induced weight gain.

In Brief
Venlafaxine Recall Due to Dissolution Failure; Interventions to Reduce Smoking Are Associated with Decreases in Suicide Risk

SSRIs and QT Prolongation
A recent meta-analysis found varying degrees of QT interval prolongation among selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

A Message from Alan J. Gelenberg, M.D.

When I first started writing BTP in the 1970s, it was to bridge the gap between new knowledge in our field and its application to patient care. Over the decades since, the need for this bridge has become even greater. Neuroscience rockets forward. Psychiatrists and other clinicians have a broader array of treatments for patients with mental disorders than we even dreamed of back then. But we have less time to spend with patients and less time to keep up with developments that affect treatment decisions. Our medications, and those prescribed by colleagues in other specialties, are more varied, complex, and prone to interactions. What were formerly crisp boundaries between major psychopharmacologic categories are now murky.

This makes the modern practice of psychiatry challenging—but also fun and promising. With the expanding armamentarium of treatment options comes enhanced ability to alleviate suffering. The mission of BTP remains constant, even while the field grows. We are still here to bridge the gap, to make science applicable and relevant, and to help you in your day-to-day work relieve distress and improve function in patients' lives.