Subscribe to Biological Therapies in Psychiatry -  Choose your plan >
IN THIS MONTH'S ISSUE:
December 2016

Botulinum Toxin for Borderline Personality Disorder?
In a small open-label case series, patients with borderline personality disorder benefited from botulinum toxin injections.

Lamotrigine: Brand-Name versus Generic
Two studies found no significant changes in blood levels or pharmacokinetic variables when patients with seizure disorders were switched between brand-name lamotrigine (Lamictal and others) and various generic formulations.

Drugs to Help Smokers Quit: New Data
A new study comparing varenicline (Chantix) and bupropion (Wellbutrin, Zyban, and others) with a nicotine patch and placebo in smokers with and without psychiatric diagnoses reports no significant difference in neuropsychiatric adverse events among the four treatment groups.

Antipsychotics, Pneumonia, and Alzheimer Disease
A large study in Finland found that antipsychotic use was associated with an increased risk of pneumonia both in patients with and those without Alzheimer disease.

In Brief
Children with Hypertension Score Lower on Neurocognitive Tests; Use of Hormonal Contraception in Women Linked to Depression

BTP's 40th Year
The next issue of this newsletter, January 2017, will mark the start of our 40th annual volume.

CME 2016
Please be sure to submit the Continuing Medical Education (CME) posttest and evaluation for 2016. You can complete the test online or print it out and then submit by email or fax.

A Message from Alan J. Gelenberg, M.D.

When I first started writing BTP in the 1970s, it was to bridge the gap between new knowledge in our field and its application to patient care. Over the decades since, the need for this bridge has become even greater. Neuroscience rockets forward. Psychiatrists and other clinicians have a broader array of treatments for patients with mental disorders than we even dreamed of back then. But we have less time to spend with patients and less time to keep up with developments that affect treatment decisions. Our medications, and those prescribed by colleagues in other specialties, are more varied, complex, and prone to interactions. What were formerly crisp boundaries between major psychopharmacologic categories are now murky.

This makes the modern practice of psychiatry challenging—but also fun and promising. With the expanding armamentarium of treatment options comes enhanced ability to alleviate suffering. The mission of BTP remains constant, even while the field grows. We are still here to bridge the gap, to make science applicable and relevant, and to help you in your day-to-day work relieve distress and improve function in patients' lives.