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IN THIS MONTH'S ISSUE:
February 2016

Drugs for Dementia
Current medications for dementia do little to improve cognition or function.

Two New Long-Acting IM Antipsychotics
Aripiprazole lauroxil (Aristada) and a 3-month formulation of paliperidone palmitate (Invega Trinza) have been approved for the treatment of schizophrenia.

Exercise for Late-Life MDD
In a study of older patients with major depressive disorder, both high- and low-intensity exercise added to antidepressant treatment improved remission rates and time to remission.

In Brief
Offspring of Mothers with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Have Increased Risk of Autism; Androgen Deprivation Therapy Linked to Increased Risk of Alzheimer Disease

A Drug Combination for Agitation in Dementia
In a multicenter trial, the combination of dextromethorphan and quinidine sulfate (Nuedexta) was statistically superior to placebo as a treatment for agitation in patients with Alzheimer disease.

A Message from Alan J. Gelenberg, M.D.

When I first started writing BTP in the 1970s, it was to bridge the gap between new knowledge in our field and its application to patient care. Over the decades since, the need for this bridge has become even greater. Neuroscience rockets forward. Psychiatrists and other clinicians have a broader array of treatments for patients with mental disorders than we even dreamed of back then. But we have less time to spend with patients and less time to keep up with developments that affect treatment decisions. Our medications, and those prescribed by colleagues in other specialties, are more varied, complex, and prone to interactions. What were formerly crisp boundaries between major psychopharmacologic categories are now murky.

This makes the modern practice of psychiatry challenging—but also fun and promising. With the expanding armamentarium of treatment options comes enhanced ability to alleviate suffering. The mission of BTP remains constant, even while the field grows. We are still here to bridge the gap, to make science applicable and relevant, and to help you in your day-to-day work relieve distress and improve function in patients' lives.