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IN THIS MONTH'S ISSUE:
March 2017

Antipsychotics in Delirium
Treatment with antipsychotics worsens clinical response in patients with dementia who are receiving palliative care.

Pregnant Women and Caffeine
Results from one study suggest that higher caffeine consumption in pregnant women is associated with lower IQ scores in offspring.

Antipsychotics Raise Mortality Risk in Patients with Parkinson Disease
Both first- and second-generation antipsychotics increase the risk of death in patients with Parkinson disease.

Treating Depression in Patients with Diabetes
Effective treatment of depression improves outcomes in patients with diabetes.

In Brief
Chamomile Extract Reduces Symptoms of Generalized Anxiety Disorder but Does Not Decrease Rate of Relapse; Fecal Transplants May Be Beneficial for Children with Autism

More on Hyponatremia with Antidepressants
Antidepressant treatment increases the risk of hospitalization for hyponatremia in elderly patients.

A Message from Alan J. Gelenberg, M.D.

When I first started writing BTP in the 1970s, it was to bridge the gap between new knowledge in our field and its application to patient care. Over the decades since, the need for this bridge has become even greater. Neuroscience rockets forward. Psychiatrists and other clinicians have a broader array of treatments for patients with mental disorders than we even dreamed of back then. But we have less time to spend with patients and less time to keep up with developments that affect treatment decisions. Our medications, and those prescribed by colleagues in other specialties, are more varied, complex, and prone to interactions. What were formerly crisp boundaries between major psychopharmacologic categories are now murky.

This makes the modern practice of psychiatry challenging—but also fun and promising. With the expanding armamentarium of treatment options comes enhanced ability to alleviate suffering. The mission of BTP remains constant, even while the field grows. We are still here to bridge the gap, to make science applicable and relevant, and to help you in your day-to-day work relieve distress and improve function in patients' lives.