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IN THIS MONTH'S ISSUE:
May 2017

Over-the-Counter Melatonin: Purity and Composition
Widely used in the United States to treat insomnia, although banned in many other countries, over-the-counter melatonin products exhibit extreme discrepancies in actual versus labeled content.

DBS for OCD
Preliminary results from a small pilot study suggest that deep brain stimulation (DBS) might be considered for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) who are incompletely responsive to medication and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).

Vitamin D Levels in Psychiatric Disorders
Two studies report that patients with psychiatric illnesses have a higher incidence of vitamin D deficiency than the general population.

In Brief
Long-Term Treatment with ADHD Medication Associated with Decreased Height and No Reduction of Symptom Severity in Adults; Treatment with Antioxidant Supplements Does Not Appear to Prevent Dementia

Infections, Antibiotics, and Mental Illness
Anti-infective agents, particularly broad-spectrum antibiotics, may be associated with an increased risk of developing schizophrenia or affective disorders.

Exercise and Depression in Children
A study in children suggests moderate-to-vigorous exercise at ages 6 and 8 years may prevent future symptoms of major depressive disorder.

A Message from Alan J. Gelenberg, M.D.

When I first started writing BTP in the 1970s, it was to bridge the gap between new knowledge in our field and its application to patient care. Over the decades since, the need for this bridge has become even greater. Neuroscience rockets forward. Psychiatrists and other clinicians have a broader array of treatments for patients with mental disorders than we even dreamed of back then. But we have less time to spend with patients and less time to keep up with developments that affect treatment decisions. Our medications, and those prescribed by colleagues in other specialties, are more varied, complex, and prone to interactions. What were formerly crisp boundaries between major psychopharmacologic categories are now murky.

This makes the modern practice of psychiatry challenging—but also fun and promising. With the expanding armamentarium of treatment options comes enhanced ability to alleviate suffering. The mission of BTP remains constant, even while the field grows. We are still here to bridge the gap, to make science applicable and relevant, and to help you in your day-to-day work relieve distress and improve function in patients' lives.