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IN THIS MONTH'S ISSUE:
August 2017

Antidepressants and the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism
In a large study of women in England and Scotland, treatment with antidepressants was associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism.

Liraglutide to Combat Antipsychotic Adverse Metabolic Effects
Preliminary results suggest liraglutide (Victoza, Saxenda) may attenuate cardiometabolic risk factors in patients taking antipsychotics for the treatment of schizophrenia.

Treating Depression in Older Patients
Treating older patients with depression requires a coordinated plan with a team of professionals and should include a cognitive assessment.

In Brief
Adjunctive Riluzole (Rilutek, Teglutik) Provides No Benefit for Patients with Treatment-Resistant Major Depression; Lamotrigine (Lamictal and others) Is as Efficacious as Lithium in Postpartum Bipolar Disorder

ADHD Medication and Vehicular Crashes
Recent evidence suggests that when patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) take ADHD medication, it lowers their risk of motor vehicle crashes.

Valproate, Hair Loss, and Biotin
Treatment with biotin reversed hair loss induced by valproate (Depakote and others) in a woman with bipolar 1 disorder.

A Message from Alan J. Gelenberg, M.D.

When I first started writing BTP in the 1970s, it was to bridge the gap between new knowledge in our field and its application to patient care. Over the decades since, the need for this bridge has become even greater. Neuroscience rockets forward. Psychiatrists and other clinicians have a broader array of treatments for patients with mental disorders than we even dreamed of back then. But we have less time to spend with patients and less time to keep up with developments that affect treatment decisions. Our medications, and those prescribed by colleagues in other specialties, are more varied, complex, and prone to interactions. What were formerly crisp boundaries between major psychopharmacologic categories are now murky.

This makes the modern practice of psychiatry challenging—but also fun and promising. With the expanding armamentarium of treatment options comes enhanced ability to alleviate suffering. The mission of BTP remains constant, even while the field grows. We are still here to bridge the gap, to make science applicable and relevant, and to help you in your day-to-day work relieve distress and improve function in patients' lives.