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IN THIS MONTH'S ISSUE:
August 2015

T. gondii, Schizophrenia, and other Psychiatric Disorders
Powerful evidence supports an association between the parasite Toxoplasma gondii and schizophrenia.

Risks of Marijuana
The combination of a large selection of products, poor labeling, and a lack of regulatory oversight in the states that have approved marijuana for recreational use has created a potentially dangerous situation for consumers, who receive little guidance regarding dosing.

Antipsychotics in Dementia: Quantifying the Mortality Risk
Antipsychotics are associated with an increase in mortality risk for patients with dementia. Alternative interventions should be considered first to treat agitation, aggression, and psychosis in this population

In Brief
Schizophrenia Patients with Genetic Mutation Have Equal Response but More Serious Side Effects; Passage of Medical Marijuana Laws Does Not Increase Adolescent Use

Compromised Health in Schizophrenia: Venous Thromboembolism and Fractures
Patients with schizophrenia have an elevated risk of venous thromboembolism and fractures.

A Message from Alan J. Gelenberg, M.D.

When I first started writing BTP in the 1970s, it was to bridge the gap between new knowledge in our field and its application to patient care. Over the decades since, the need for this bridge has become even greater. Neuroscience rockets forward. Psychiatrists and other clinicians have a broader array of treatments for patients with mental disorders than we even dreamed of back then. But we have less time to spend with patients and less time to keep up with developments that affect treatment decisions. Our medications, and those prescribed by colleagues in other specialties, are more varied, complex, and prone to interactions. What were formerly crisp boundaries between major psychopharmacologic categories are now murky.

This makes the modern practice of psychiatry challenging—but also fun and promising. With the expanding armamentarium of treatment options comes enhanced ability to alleviate suffering. The mission of BTP remains constant, even while the field grows. We are still here to bridge the gap, to make science applicable and relevant, and to help you in your day-to-day work relieve distress and improve function in patients' lives.