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IN THIS MONTH'S ISSUE:
May 2016

Flibanserin (Addyi): Data and Opinion
Further research is required to determine whether the modest benefits from flibanserin (Addyi) for women with acquired generalized hypoactive sexual desire disorder outweigh its risks.

Varenicline in Schizophrenia
A recent study of varenicline (Chantix) in patients with schizophrenia found that, compared with placebo, it reduced smoking without increasing psychiatric symptoms and was well tolerated but did not improve cognition.

New Treatment Approaches for Bipolar Depression
Recent studies of treatments for bipolar depression report that lamotrigine (Lamictal and others) added to quetiapine (Seroquel and others) improves depressive symptoms; folic acid may reduce the effectiveness of lamotrigine; and agomelatine is not efficacious in this population.

In Brief
Primary Care Physicians Use Management Care Processes Less for Depression than for Other Chronic Illnesses: Antipsychotic-Treated Patients with Schizophrenia Experience No Benefits from Adjunctive Oxytocin

A Message from Alan J. Gelenberg, M.D.

When I first started writing BTP in the 1970s, it was to bridge the gap between new knowledge in our field and its application to patient care. Over the decades since, the need for this bridge has become even greater. Neuroscience rockets forward. Psychiatrists and other clinicians have a broader array of treatments for patients with mental disorders than we even dreamed of back then. But we have less time to spend with patients and less time to keep up with developments that affect treatment decisions. Our medications, and those prescribed by colleagues in other specialties, are more varied, complex, and prone to interactions. What were formerly crisp boundaries between major psychopharmacologic categories are now murky.

This makes the modern practice of psychiatry challenging—but also fun and promising. With the expanding armamentarium of treatment options comes enhanced ability to alleviate suffering. The mission of BTP remains constant, even while the field grows. We are still here to bridge the gap, to make science applicable and relevant, and to help you in your day-to-day work relieve distress and improve function in patients' lives.